Minerals & Vitamins: The Foods Where We Get Them

Minerals & Vitamins: The Foods Where We Get Them

Dietary minerals and vitamins are crucial in maintaining good health. They are essential in keeping most bodily functions. Without these micronutrients our bodies will be susceptible to diseases that can be life-threatening. At the same time, some of the organs in our body may not function well as a result of the lack of certain vitamin and minerals.
It is important that we source our vitamins and minerals through our food. This is economically viable than augmenting it through vitamin supplements. However, the vitamin and mineral content of some foods are not equal. There are certain food that you need to consume in combination with other to get the optimum yield of the vitamins and minerals.
Spinach, green peas, tomato juice, soy milk and lean ham are very rich source of vitamin B1 or thiamin. Thiamin supports energy metabolism and nerve function. It is a water-soluble vitamin which means it needs to be dissolved in water and is easily eliminated from your system when you urinate. Therefore, you need to replenish your supply of water-soluble vitamins every day.
Retinol or vitamin A is sourced from yellow fruits such as mangoes and green, leafy vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, tomato juice, sweet potatoes, pumpkin and beef liver. It is helpful in maintaining good vision. It helps in keeping your skin, teeth and bones healthy. It is fat-soluble and it can be stored in the body.
Vitamin B2 or riboflavin supports vision, metabolism and keeps the skin healthy. You can get vitamin B2 from spinach, broccoli, mushrooms, eggs, milk, liver, clams and oysters. Vitamin B3 or niacin also supports energy and metabolism and the proper functions of the nervous and digestive systems. Spinach is a major source of vitamin B3 together with lean beef, chicken breast, tuna, shrimp and liver.
Biotin aids in fat synthesis, amino acid metabolism and glycogen synthesis and can be found in most foods. On the other hand pantothenic acid helps in the metabolism of energy in the body. Pyridoxine is found in some fruits like bananas, watermelon, tomato juice, broccoli, spinach, squash, potatoes, white rice and other foods. It aids in the metabolism of amino acids and red blood cell production. Folate is responsible in aiding new cell formation can be found in green beans, tomato juice, peas, lentils, garbanzos and some beans.
Vitamin B12 aids in new cell synthesis and amino acids it also supports maintenance of nerve cell can be sourced from meats, poultry, fish, shellfish, milk and eggs. Vitamin C or ascorbic acid helps fight infections, increases iron absorption and are an excellent antioxidant can be found in citrus fruits, spinach and broccoli. Vitamin D promotes bone health is sourced primarily from sunlight, but also can be sourced through milk, liver or fatty fish. Vitamin E is an excellent antioxidant can be sourced from plant oils, some fruits like avocado and shrimp. Vitamin K regulates blood calcium is sourced leafy green vegetables, cabbage and liver.
Minerals like sodium can be found in salt which is an excellent electrolyte; the mineral chloride aids in digestion is found in salt, milk and eggs. Potassium maintains the nerve impulses can be sourced in some vegetables like spinach and fruits like avocado. Calcium is great for bones and teeth and milk is the richest source. Phosphorus can be sourced from all animal-derived food. Magnesium aids in bone mineralization and maintenance of healthy muscles can be found in most food. Iodine prevents goiter and improves intelligence is found in most seafood. Zinc aids in wound healing and participates against infection is found in spinach and liver. Iron is needed for a healthy blood is found in liver and other animal-derived food.